We are pleased to announce a lecture by
Dr Marta Figlerowicz
Yale University

A Short History of Virality

The lecture is going to be a part of the
American Studies Colloquium Series.

October 10, 2019 at 4:00 p.m
American Studies Center, room 317

What about?

The lecture will talk about what virality is and how does one represent it? “A Short History of Virality” draws on research in the history of science, network theory, and media theory, to outline how the phenomenon of virality was gradually “discovered” and theorized. It then discusses recent representations of viral network events in American cinema, which illustrate various aspects of virality’s political, phenomenological, and scolar contradictions.

See the video from the lecture!

Who?

Marta Figlerowicz is an Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, English, and Film and Media at Yale University. A comparative scholar of philosophies and representations of intersubjectivity, she is the author of two books, Flat Protagonists (2016) and Spaces of Feeling (2017). Her writing has also appeared in academic and non-academic publications ranging from Foreign Affairs to New Literary History. This talk derives from her new book project in progress Mythical Thinking: The Self in the Age of New Media

Her research articulates a counter-tradition to aesthetic individualism that has been present in Western art and literature at least since the seventeenth century, and which takes on particularly striking resonances in our contemporary digitally-mediated environments.


She also writes literary and cultural criticism for publications such as The Washington Post, n+1, Cabinet, Jacobin, The Los Angeles Review of Books, The Yale Review, Logic, and Boston Review.

At Yale, she have taught courses on philosophies of the self, modernism, literary and critical theory, and world cinema. Marta Figlerowicz is a co-organizer of Utopia after Utopia, a research initiative on contemporary post-socialist critical theory and art practice, and co-PI for an upcoming Sawyer Seminar called Ordering the Multitude: Encyclopedia, Atlas, Museum. She is originally from Poznań, Poland.

Year 2019/2020

January 23, 2020 at 5pm; Renewable energy sources as socio-technical project

January 10, 2020

During the lecture, doctor Aleksandra Lis will present social aspects of energy production in Poland and Argentina, as well as the meaning of electric energy for different actors – communities, nations and companies.

Year 2019/2020

January 17, 2020 at 10am; Star Trek seminar

January 7, 2020

The seminar consists of prior viewing of the two episodes of Star Trek and the following discussion led by our guest lecturer – Stefan Rabitsch from University of Graz. Read more, sign up and participate!

poster by Magdalena Krzemińśka

Year 2019/2020

January 16, 2020 at 4pm; “I Like Big Hats and I Cannot Lie”: Petasus Americanus or a Cultural History of Cowboy Hats

January 6, 2020

Stefan Rabitsch will argue during the lecture that cowboy hats do matter. Unlike other headwear, western hats—*petasus americanus*—have retained their potency and recognizability as a wearable signifiers of Americanness.

Year 2019/2020

January 16-17, 2020; Film and TV Criticism Methodology Workshops

January 6, 2020

During each session Kaja Klimek, who is an educator, translator, and film and culture critic, will present key trends and perspectives in current film and tv criticism in various media, including traditional and new media.

courtesy: haveabite.in

American Studies Colloquium Series

January 14, 2020 at 4pm; Food: A Systemic Approach

December 27, 2019

Knowing where our food comes from is important to us as consumers and as citizens, allowing us to make more careful choices. During the lecture, Fabio Parasecoli will explore different conceptualizations of the global food system, together with the structures, flows, and stakeholders that compose it.