We are pleased to announce an online lecture by
Joshua Clark Davis
(University of Baltimore)

Police Against the Movement: US Law Enforcement and Racial Justice Activists from the 1960s to Today

This lecture is going to be the a part
of the 2020/2021 Fall Edition of the
American Studies Colloquium Series.

Thursday, January 14, 2021
at 4:45 p.m

You can get 2 OZN points for participating in this event.
Check how to collect OZN points online.

poster by Paulina Derecka (@paulinaderecka)

Where?

This lecture will be streamed online. To attend, click the button below or enter https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82721549065 into your browser, and join the meeting.

What?

How can protesters bring about a meaningful transformation of the United States’ punitive, racist system of law enforcement premised on the use of violence? Will efforts to abolish the police or even reduce their budgets succeed? The answers to these questions remain to be seen. But one thing we can say with confidence: to transform the present and the future of policing, we must first understand its past. Half a century after the 1960s, we must come to terms with how America’s police sought to thwart the work of the civil rights movement if we wish to eliminate racism and brutality in law enforcement today. First, how did police treat and mistreat the civil rights movement? Second, how did civil rights activists use pickets, rallies, and lawsuits—sometimes successfully, others times not—to combat abusive police, creating a blueprint for protest that the Movement for Black Lives revived decades later? Third, how did repression of civil rights activists in the 1960s foretell police attacks on racial justice activists today, as well as the larger crisis of inequality in our criminal justice system?

Who?

Joshua Clark Davis is an Assistant Professor of Legal, Ethical and Historical Studies at the University of Baltimore. He teaches and researches broadly in twentieth-century United States History with a focus on social movements, policing, capitalism, urban history, and African American History.

He wrote a book “From Head Shops to Whole Foods: The Rise and Fall of Activist Entrepreneurs” (Colombia University Press, 2017), which explores how small businesses such as organic food stores, head shops, feminist businesses, and African American bookstores emerged from social movements and countercultures in the 1960s and ’70s. He is also a co-editor of the essay collection “Baltimore Revisited. Stories of Inequality and Resistance in a U.S. City” and a devoted public historian with a deep interest in working with communities beyond universities.

Year 2021/2022

May 30: The (Early) Literature of COVID-19. Session V

May 24, 2022

This open seminar will explore initial literary responses to the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, offering participants opportunities to talk through this world-changing event. By the end of the seminar, participants should be able to not only identify but also to interpret and evaluate common features of early COVID literature within and beyond the United States.

American Studies Colloquium Series

June 2: Eat, Migrate, Love: Gastronomic and Sexual Desire as Identity

May 24, 2022

This talk, whose title plays off the Julia Robert’s film “Eat, Pray, Love,” will explore queer films and queer immigrants’ relationships to food as part of the cultural identity, and how the rituals around food preparation and consumption informs their negotiations in the US.

Year 2021/2022

June 8: Sounds of Dune(s): Music-landscaping in Cinema

May 24, 2022

In this workshop we’ll talk about Frank Herbert’s “Dune” and its many adaptations (both real and unrealized), in order to see how music and sound are used to bridge sensory gaps in cinematic experiences, and how to write about such synaesthetic encounters in our research.

Year 2021/2022

May 23: Gender/Sexuality Conference ASC

May 23, 2022

ASC’s Gender/Sexuality Research Group invites all students and faculty members to the first ASC’s Student Conference on gender and sexuality in American studies. We have an exciting day planned, with a keynote by Dr. Richard Reitsma and four panels of student presentations, on everything from feminist theories to representation of trans characters on TV and challenging the norms of masculinity.

American Studies Colloquium Series

May 19: ‘bits of agitation on the body of the whole’: Animals in COVID-19 Literature

May 19, 2022

Given its origins in horseshoe bat populations, the SARS-CoV-2 virus offers many opportunities to re-think our relationships with the nonhuman world around us. In this talk, Raymond Malewitz will explore emerging cultural narratives embodied in COVID poetry and fiction, which tend to reinforce the stiff differences between the human and the nonhuman as physically and conceptually separate from one another.