We are pleased to announce an online lecture by
Alyson Patsavas
(The University of Illinois at Chicago)

Archiving Pain: On Crip Queer Evidence

This lecture is going to be a part of the
American Studies Colloquium Series,
which are running online until regular
operations are resumed!

Thursday, May 7, 2020
at 4:00 p.m

It is still possible to get OZN points for participating
in this event! Check how to do this here.

Where?

Online on our Facebook group!

What?

This talk weaves personal experience, archival research, and a photo-essay together to ask how we might crip and queer evidence of pain. Philosophers, doctors, and pain studies scholars alike lament the absence of objective measurement tools to verify and prove pain’s existence. Arguments of pain’s purported resistance to language (Scarry) and uniquely subjective nature abound to frame personal accounts of pain as flawed, provisional, and suspect. Biomedicine has, in turn, offered an assortment of supplementary diagnostic tools meant to evidence pain—from pain scales to pain tracking apps. Despite the fantasy of certainty that such “biocertifications” (Samuels) offer, experiences of pain remain widely dismissed among women, older adults, and racial and ethnic minorities because of the absence of objective measurement tools. In this talk, I juxtapose material from a history of pain medicine collection with personal accounts of pain to track and interrogate the gaps between two differing archives of pain. In doing so, I outline dominant pain epistemologies and, drawing from critical theory’s interrogations and re-imaginings of archives, theorize what constitutes crip and queer evidence of pain.

Who?

Alyson Patsavas is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Disability and Human Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is also the Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies. Her scholarship is situated at intersections of disability studies, feminist theory and queer theory, and focuses on the cultural politics of pain, health and illness as well as representations of disability in film, television, and popular culture.

Her work appears in Different Bodies: Essays on Disability in Film and Television, The Feminist Wire, Somatechnics, Disability Studies Quarterly, The Czech Sociological Review, and the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies. Patsavas is also a writer and producer on the documentary film Code of the Freaks (2020) that examines crip culture’s response to Hollywood representations of disability. She is currently working on a manuscript that interrogates the discursive construction of pain and pain relief as a distinct cultural, economic, and political “problem” to theorize crip, queer interventions into how we come to know and understand pain.

News

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May 29, 2020

The UW Ksawerow building is no longer shut down, and the ASC faculty and staff can use their offices. Still all the ASC instruction continues remotely. The ASC administration will be working remotely until further notice.  It is possible to arrange an in-person appointment via email. Though the ASC Library’s reading rooms will be closed, the Library’s checkout counter will be open on Tuesdays 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm and Fridays 10:00 am – 2:00 pm.

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The ASC offers a unique, interdisciplinary American Studies program and is is one of the biggest American Studies institutions in Europe. Check out what to expect as the student of the ASC!

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Important issues for the end of the spring semester

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As there are new developments and rules for our academic life and activities, I believe I should relate them to you to keep you updated. The most important issues for now are: Language exams, Exam session, Registration, End-of-semester questionnaire, OSA Library operation.

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Latest information and advice for the UW community during the coronavirus pandemic

May 22, 2020

On 21st May, the UW rector issued a new order on rules for studying and working at UW. Online teaching and learning will continue, except classes which cannot be conducted remotely. It is possible to work from home, according to a duty system or flexible working hours. The health, safety and well-being of members of the UW community remain the university’s priority.

American Studies Colloquium Series

May 28, 2020 at 6pm, ONLINE; An Erotic Toolkit: Asexual and Aromantic Critiques of Heteronormativity

May 21, 2020

This talk will explore the feminist, queer, and anti-racist tradition of the erotic, drawing on Audre Lorde’s work in particular. Ela Przybylo will discuss how the erotic provides a distinct model for theorizing relating that creates space for the inclusion of asexuality and challenges compulsory sexuality.