We are pleased to announce an online lecture by
Elizabeth Cullen Dunn
(Indiana University Bloomington)

Refugees and Racial Capitalism: What “Integration” in the US Labor Market Means?

This lecture is going to be the a part
of the 2020/2021 Fall Edition of the
American Studies Colloquium Series.

Thursday, January 21, 2021
at 4:45 p.m

You can get 2 OZN points for participating in this event.
Check how to collect OZN points online.

poster by Paulina Derecka (@paulinaderecka)

Where?

This lecture will be streamed online. To attend, click the button below or enter https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86141938754 into your browser, and join the meeting.

What?

Refugee resettlement has long been seen as a purely humanitarian act. When refugees are “integrated” into the labor market, it is seen as a tool to promote values such as self-sufficiency and dignity. But refugee labor is often needed by host countries, and refugees are often inserted into industries where they are tasked with jobs host country nationals refuse to do. Using the example of the American meatpacking industry, which relies heavily on refugees resettled by the US Department of State, I discuss why refugees were simultaneously deemed “essential” and “prohibited” during the COVID-19 epidemic. This paradox, in which refugees are both indispensable and stigmatized, is used to racialize and devalue their labor, creating ethnic enclaves in the labor market that simultaneously permit them to work and trap them in dangerous, underpaid jobs.

Who?

Elizabeth Cullen Dunn is Professor of Geography at Indiana University. Her current work focuses on refugees and labor.

She has worked on forced migration and humanitarian aid, which resulted in her book, No Path Home: Humanitarian Camps and the Grief of Displacement. Her first book, Privatizing Poland: Baby Food, Big Business and the Remaking of Labor, focused on blue collar workers in the food industry during the transition from state socialism.

American Studies Colloquium Series

January 21, 2021 at 4:45pm, Online; Refugees and Racial Capitalism: What “Integration” in the US Labor Market Means?

January 20, 2021

This talk by Elizabeth Cullen Dunn focuses on the situation of refugees during the COVID-19 epidemic, by discussing the example of the American meatpacking industry, which relies heavily on refugees resettled by the US Department of State.

Year 2020/2021

January 25, 2021 at 5:00 p.m., Online; Weird Space Junkies: Speculations on the Psychedelic

January 20, 2021

In this lecture, Jędrzej Burszta proposes to examine the cultural history of psychedelic science fiction in the United States, focusing on the legacy of the 1960s New Wave movement.

American Studies Colloquium Series

January 28, 2021 at 4:45pm, Online; Cyberfeminism, an Orthodox Version in North America: Social Media as a Counterpublic Transformative Space of Religiosity

January 19, 2021

Our next guest, Jessica Roda from Georgetown University will give a talk on the usage of social media by ultra-Orthodox women, as a tool for the development of cyberfeminism(s) in the transformative counterpublic space reinforcing religious norms and authority.

Year 2020/2021

January 18, 2021 at 5:00 p.m., Online; The Ur-Savage: The Anthropological Horror of Green Inferno and Bone Tomahawk

January 18, 2021

This lecture aims to elaborate on the problem of presenting indigenous people as a threat in current horror cinema, and to analyze it through the lenses of growing racist and far-right ideologies in the USA.

News

Festival “Imagining the Future” – call for proposals

January 14, 2021

Students and the university staff of the University of Warsaw are invited to take part in Festival “Imagining the Future” at the Sorbonne University, which focuses on issues of coexistence of humans and the environment.