We are pleased to announce an online lecture by
Laura Levitt
(Temple University)

American Jewish Loss After the Holocaust: An Object Lesson

This lecture is going to be the a part
of the 2021/2022 Spring Edition of the
American Studies Colloquium Series.

Thursday, May 12, 2022
at 5:15 p.m.

You can get 2 OZN points for participating in this event.
Check how to collect OZN points online here.

poster by Joanna Bębenek

Where?

This lecture will be streamed online. To attend, click the button below or enter https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85864913094 into your browser, and join the meeting.

 

What?

This talk asks critical questions about the future of Holocaust commemoration in the United States. How will the Holocaust continued to be remembered as memory and history come together, as those survivors who have so powerfully told their stories and lived their lives after the Holocaust are coming to their last days? This talk describes how the Shoah has been commemorated in the United States and what is at stake at this historical crossroad. It addresses what it means to consider “after” as not just after the war, or after the Shoah, but as memory becomes history. It describes how the Holocaust has been remembered in the United States in the past and how it might be remembered going forward. It reconsiders how the loss that is the Shoah is experienced and understood in relation to other American Jewish losses not as competitive memories but rather in terms of how different losses touch and illuminate each other. And finally, it focuses on what will continue to prompt those memories, the people but also increasingly, the objects that occasion these enactments.

Who?

Laura Levitt is Professor of Religion, Jewish Studies, and Gender at Temple University where she has chaired the Religion Department and directed both the Jewish Studies and the Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies Programs. Levitt is the author The Objects that Remain (2020); American Jewish Loss after the Holocaust (2007); and Jews and Feminism: The Ambivalent Search for Home (1997) and a co-editor of Impossible Images: Contemporary Art After the Holocaust (2003) and Judaism Since Gender (1997). Levitt edits NYU Press’s North American Religions Series with Tracy Fessenden (Arizona State University) and David Harrington Watt (Haverford College).

This event is organized under the “Excellence Initiative – Research University” Programme (IDUB). Prof. Laura Levitt has been invited for the IDUB Mentoring Visit by the Gender/Sexuality Research Group, and specifically by dr. Karolina Krasuska, dr. Ludmiła Janion and dr. Marta Usiekniewicz.

Year 2022/2023

December 6: Witches in American Popular Music: Introduction + Discussion

November 23, 2022

Rebellious and powerful, witches penetrate the social spaces and popular culture. In her introduction, Joanna Kaniewska will map the presence of witches in American music. Later, she will invite all the participants to discuss the “music witches,” their common traits and associations.

Year 2022/2023

ASC Thanksgiving Dinner

November 18, 2022

We’re happy to invite all students, faculty and staff to join our traditional Thanksgiving Potluck Dinner!

American Studies Colloquium Series

November 17: Imagining Sex Between White Men: Slash Fan Fiction and the Racial Politics of Feminist Fantasy

November 10, 2022

In this talk, Alexis Lothian discusses slash fan fiction by examining the ways that dynamics of racialization can be critically engaged on and through the bodies of white male protagonists, and whether a speculative erotics of white masculinity might have something to contribute to a feminism committed to antiracist politics.

News

The ASC’s New Americanist will be published with Edinburgh University Press

October 28, 2022

Starting from Spring 2023, the ASC’s New Americanist will be published with Edinburgh University Press in cooperation with the University of Warsaw.

American Studies Colloquium Series

October 27: The Shapes of Apocalyptic Time: Decolonising Eco-Eschatology

October 20, 2022

On the contrary to contemporary ecological discourses, rooted in linear temporality derived from Christian eschatology, this presentation offers to see eco-eschatological time as a spiral and as a non-contemporaneous totality, which can help us devise more accurate strategy for decolonial environmental politics.