Weird Fictions Research Group invites you to a talk by
Tracey M. Salisbury
(California State University)

Play This Only At Night: Hip Hop, Horror, and Afrofuturism

This event is a part of the Weird Music series organized by the Weird Fictions Research Group members and their invited guests.

Wednesday, November 3, 2021
at 5:30 p.m.

You can get 2 OZN points for participating in this event.
Check how to collect OZN points online here.

Where?

This is an online event. To attend, click the button below or enter https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89224543308 into your browser, and join the meeting.

What?

The worlds of hip-hop music and horror films can sometimes present darkly frightening, brutally violent, and hopelessly apocalyptic representations of society and the people that live within in them. Both genres have been heavily criticized for embracing the dark side of humanity and occasionally glorifying that ugliness. It is not the first-time collective criticism has been directed at creative artists and the art they produce instead of taking a hard look at the stark realities of our communities. In the 21st century, our collective nations are grappling with a lethal global pandemic, extremely polarizing politics, growing socio-economic divides, and a Mother Earth that is slowly dying before our eyes. This talk will address how we should pay closer attention to intersections of the genres of hip hop and horror, their narratives and representations of humanity serve as both a history and warning that the field of Afrofuturism has predicted is coming sooner than we think. Why does the future hold?

Who?

Dr. Tracey M. Salisbury is an Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies/Ethnic Studies at California State University, Bakersfield, where she has been a faculty member since 2017. She teaches Black Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies courses within the Interdisciplinary Studies program as well as Sport History and Sport Sociology courses for the Kinesiology department. Dr. Salisbury graduated with a BA in Political Science from Holy Cross College and a MA in Sport Administration from Central Michigan University. She earned her PhD in Kinesiology with an emphasis in Sport History, Sport Sociology and American/African History from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. Dr. Salisbury’s research interests focus on Black women and sport, Black Feminism, Afrofuturism, Black popular culture particularly, rap music and hip-hop culture, and film studies focusing principally on the horror genre.

Year 2022/2023

December 6: Witches in American Popular Music: Introduction + Discussion

November 23, 2022

Rebellious and powerful, witches penetrate the social spaces and popular culture. In her introduction, Joanna Kaniewska will map the presence of witches in American music. Later, she will invite all the participants to discuss the “music witches,” their common traits and associations.

Year 2022/2023

ASC Thanksgiving Dinner

November 18, 2022

We’re happy to invite all students, faculty and staff to join our traditional Thanksgiving Potluck Dinner!

American Studies Colloquium Series

November 17: Imagining Sex Between White Men: Slash Fan Fiction and the Racial Politics of Feminist Fantasy

November 10, 2022

In this talk, Alexis Lothian discusses slash fan fiction by examining the ways that dynamics of racialization can be critically engaged on and through the bodies of white male protagonists, and whether a speculative erotics of white masculinity might have something to contribute to a feminism committed to antiracist politics.

News

The ASC’s New Americanist will be published with Edinburgh University Press

October 28, 2022

Starting from Spring 2023, the ASC’s New Americanist will be published with Edinburgh University Press in cooperation with the University of Warsaw.

American Studies Colloquium Series

October 27: The Shapes of Apocalyptic Time: Decolonising Eco-Eschatology

October 20, 2022

On the contrary to contemporary ecological discourses, rooted in linear temporality derived from Christian eschatology, this presentation offers to see eco-eschatological time as a spiral and as a non-contemporaneous totality, which can help us devise more accurate strategy for decolonial environmental politics.